Sonoma County Fires

Located only eight miles from Santa Rosa and where the devastating Northern California Fires erupted two weeks ago, Rosemira was spared destruction.

 

The Santa Ana’s started blowing on Friday. Hot and dry, they struck Sonoma County with gusts up to 60 mph. The winds picked up ferocity on Saturday, whipping the trees and showering the ground with autumn leaves. Sunday night found me driving on Hwy 12 between the towns of Sonoma & Glen Ellen toward Santa Rosa and home after dropping off my son at his boarding school. Driving on that road, one I travel every weekend, felt ominous. The fires hadn’t started yet but the wind was intense, blowing debris over the road, an eerie feeling about it. My car wasn’t moved by the winds, but my psyche was. I assumed it was because I was tired.

 

Moon rising over a fiery landscape

 

I arrived home. The high winds now carried the scent of smoke that grew thicker by the hour. The winds blew relentlessly. We stood on our porch in Sebastopol and weren’t sure what was going on. We couldn’t hear fire engines and no distress signals came through the neighborhood website.
Monday morning arrived to reveal the tragedy of Coffee Park—a residential 800-home community on the northern outskirts of the city of Santa Rosa—and only eight miles east of Sebastopol. The photos showed apocalyptic devastation, one reminiscent of war. All that was left were smoldering cinders. So close yet a universe away from us.

 

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Animals at Safari West were spared

 

The fires spread and with them came the evacuees—thousands of people with nothing left to their belongings but the shirt on their backs. The death toll rose as did the property damage while the best of firefighters equipped with the latest technologies stood helpless as the fires roared and scorched everything in their path. The town of Sebastopol, our home and workshop, was spared by the grace of western winds blowing east from the Pacific.

The time to take stock is upon us—the worst natural disaster in our county’s history. The task ahead is long and arduous and requires a strong and united community. Rosemira stands shoulder to shoulder with all Sonoma County citizens and is committed to donating 15% of our profits over the next 30 days. It’s not a whole lot, but it’s done with love. We hope you can contribute to our effort.

Let’s all take a moment to appreciate our lives, friends and family, and give thanks to what we sometimes take for granted

Kids unite with their rescued cat

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